Why Do Footballers Raise Their Hands Before A Corner?

Have you ever watched a football match and noticed players raising their hands before a corner? You may have wondered why they do this. Well, the answer might surprise you! 

Footballers raise their hands for more than just to show off; it’s actually part of an important strategy used by teams on the pitch. Read on to find out why footballers lift their arms during corners and what purpose it serves.

Footballers raise their hands before a corner to indicate which side of the goal they plan to shoot on. This allows teammates in the box to adjust their position accordingly and also warns opponents where not to stand. It’s an integral part of defensive strategy that helps teams get more goals from corners.

Different Types Of Corners

There are several different types of corners that can be played in soccer, each with their own unique characteristics and benefits. Here are seven different types of corners that you may come across:

1. Short Corners

A short corner is when the corner kick is taken from closer to the goal line, rather than the corner flag. This can be an effective strategy when the team taking the corner is looking to create a quick, surprise-attacking opportunity. The ball is usually played to a teammate who is positioned near the edge of the penalty area, rather than attempting to deliver it into the box.

2. Near-post Corners

A near-post corner is when the ball is delivered into the area near the goalpost. This can be a good option when the team taking the corner is looking to create a chance for a teammate to attack the ball with their head or feet. It can also be an effective strategy for catching the opposing team’s defense off guard and creating confusion in the box.

3. Far-post Corners

A far-post corner is the opposite of a near-post corner, with the ball being delivered into the area near the opposite goalpost. This can be a useful tactic when the team taking the corner is looking to create space for a teammate to attack the ball with their head or feet.

It can also be an effective way to stretch the opposing team’s defense and create space for attacking players to make a run into the box.

4. Mid-range Corners

A mid-range corner is when the ball is delivered into the middle of the penalty area, rather than toward either goalpost. This can be a good option when the team taking the corner is looking to create a chance for a teammate to attack the ball with their head or feet.

It can also be an effective way to create confusion in the box and create space for attacking players to make a run into the area.

5. Direct Corners

A direct corner is when the ball is kicked directly into the goal, without being touched by another player first. This is a relatively rare occurrence, but can be an effective way to surprise the opposing team’s defense and catch them off guard.

6. In-swinging Corners

An in-swinging corner is when the ball is delivered into the penalty area with a curved trajectory, swinging toward the goal. This can be a useful tactic when the team taking the corner is looking to create a chance for a teammate to attack the ball with their head. It can also be an effective way to create confusion in the box and stretch the opposing team’s defense.

7. Out-swinging Corners

An out-swinging corner is the opposite of an in-swinging corner, with the ball being delivered into the penalty area with a curved trajectory that swings away from the goal. 

This can be a useful tactic when the team taking the corner is looking to create space for a teammate to attack the ball with their feet. It can also be an effective way to stretch the opposing team’s defense and create space for attacking players to make a run into the area.

Why Do Footballers Raise Their Hands Before A Corner?

Have you ever noticed footballers raising their hands before a corner kick? This is a common sight on the pitch, and there are a few reasons why players do this.

First and foremost, raising their hands allows players to communicate their intentions to their teammates. By signaling where they want the ball to be delivered, players can coordinate their movements and create scoring opportunities. 

For example, if a player raises their hand near the edge of the penalty area, it may indicate that they want the ball played to their feet for a shot on goal. On the other hand, if a player raises their hand near the goalpost, it may indicate that they want the ball delivered for a header.

Raising their hands can also be a way for players to call for the ball and take ownership of the corner kick. Players can assert their authority and take control of the attacking opportunity by making themselves visible and signaling their desire to take the kick.

In addition to these tactical reasons, raising their hands can also be a way for players to show their enthusiasm and commitment to the team’s success. By visibly expressing their desire to make a difference on the pitch, players can inspire their teammates and rally the team toward victory.

Different Types Of Hand Signals When Taking A Corner

When taking a corner kick, footballers often use hand signals to communicate their intentions to their teammates. These hand signals can take many different forms and can be used for a variety of purposes. Here are some different types of hand signals that you might see when a team is taking a corner:

1. Short Corner Hand Signal

When a player wants to take a short corner, they may raise their hand and make a circular motion with their finger. This indicates that they want the ball played back to them or another teammate who is positioned closer to the goal line. Short corners can be an effective strategy when the team is looking to create a quick, surprise attacking opportunity.

2. Near-post Corner Hand Signal

When a player wants the ball delivered to the near-post, they may raise their hand and point towards the relevant goalpost.

This indicates that they want the ball delivered to their head or feet for a chance to attack the goal. Near-post corners can be an effective strategy when the team is looking to create a chance for a player to attack the ball with their head or feet.

3. Far-post Corner Hand Signal

The opposite of a near-post corner hand signal, a player may raise their hand and point towards the opposite goalpost to indicate that they want the ball delivered to the far-post. 

Far-post corners can be an effective strategy when the team is looking to stretch the opposing team’s defense and create space for attacking players to make a run into the box.

4. Mid-range Corner Hand Signal

When a player wants the ball delivered to the middle of the penalty area, they may raise their hand and make a horizontal motion towards the center of the box. 

This indicates that they want the ball delivered to their head or feet for a chance to attack the goal. Mid-range corners can be an effective strategy when the team is looking to create confusion in the box and create space for attacking players to make a run into the area.

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